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By MagneGrip, Sep 5 2019 06:00PM

Firefighter cancer is a looming critical concern for each and every fire fighter and is the most dangerous threat to the health and safety of our nation’s firefighters. Cancer has caused 61 percent of career firefighter line-of-duty deaths since 2002 and caused 70 percent of line-of-duty deaths for career firefighters in 2016. By contrast, heart disease caused 18 percent of line-of-duty deaths. (IAFF data Jan. 1, 2002 to March 31, 2017.)

Multiple studies, beginning in 2006 and including the 2010, 2013 and 2015 NIOSH cancer studies, have repeatedly demonstrated credible evidence for statistically higher rates of multiple types of cancers in firefighters compared to the general American population. In general, firefighters have a 9 percent higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer and a 14 percent higher risk of dying from cancer than the general U.S. population:

• Testicular cancer (2.02 times greater risk)

• Mesothelioma (2.0 times greater risk)

• Multiple myeloma (1.53 times greater risk)

• Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (1.51 times greater risk)

• Skin cancer (1.39 times greater risk)

• Prostate cancer (1.28 times greater risk)

• Malignant melanoma (1.31 times great risk)

• Brain cancer (1.31 times greater risk)

• Colon cancer (1.21 times great risk)

• Leukemia (1.14 times greater risk)

In women firefighters, research studies from San Francisco Fire Department and Florida indicated a higher rate of breast, skin, thyroid and lung cancer than the normal population.

We are beginning to understand the horrific magnitude of the problem, the challenges involved and the changes required in education, training, operations, medical screenings and personal accountability to effectively address cancer in the fire service.

Yet, the signs of firefighters’ exposure to carcinogens are everywhere:

• Photos showing firefighters working in active and overhaul fire environments with SCBA on their backs but not masks on their faces.

• Firefighters still proudly wear dirty and contaminated turnout gear and helmets.

• Some fire instructors wear their carcinogen-loaded helmets and bunker gear as symbols of their firefighting experience.

• Diesel exhaust, a recognized carcinogen, still contaminates many fire stations— apparatus bays as well as living, sleeping and eating quarters.

• Many firefighters only have one set of gear, which means they are continually re-contaminated from previous fires.

• Some diesel exhaust systems — even when installed — are not used, are used incorrectly or are poorly maintained.

• Bunker gear is stored in apparatus bays where it is bathed in diesel exhaust.

• Bunker gear goes unwashed for months at a time, even after significant fires.

• Many volunteers carry their contaminated gear in the trunks of their personal vehicles resulting in superheating and enhanced off-gassing of contaminants into the passenger compartment and sometimes even into their homes.

• Firefighters put their contaminated gear into the cabs of their apparatus both before and after fires.

• Some firefighters still take their contaminated bunker pants and boots into sleeping quarters.

• The interiors of apparatus cabs are not decontaminated adequately or frequently.

• Many firefighters do not take showers immediately following fires.

“Pinpointing the cause of cancer is extremely difficult because firefighters are not exposed to just one agent. They are exposed to multiple cancer-causing agents. Because of the multiple exposures and the multiple routes of exposure — they inhale carcinogens and carcinogens are absorbed through the skin — it is also highly unlikely for firefighters to get only one type of cancer,” said Grace LeMasters, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology at the University of Cincinnati and the lead author of a 2006 meta-analysis of 32 published studies of cancer in firefighters.

Unfortunately, there is no immediate visible impact of carcinogenic exposure, since the time between exposure to carcinogens and the appearance of malignancies can be 20 years or longer.

Article updated August 2019.

Excerpt from: Firefighter Cancer Support Network white paper, “Firefighter Cancer Fact Check 2017”, Timothy Elliott

Source:

https://firefightercancersupport.org

By MagneGrip, Aug 22 2019 07:52PM

Since 1993, we’ve worked to design and engineer the best, most cost-effective answer to the health threat of diesel exhaust emissions in firehouses and vehicle maintenance facilities. Here are several comments from our satisfied MagneGrip and AirHAWK customers.

“The SFT System is great because the hose gets out of the way. The hoses in other systems would knock things over and interfere with our runs. Before the MagneGrip installation, the air quality was poor; fumes hung in the air and soot covered the walls of the firehouses. The air quality is a 100-percent improvement from before. We can feel the difference.”

Tim McFarland, Battalion Chief, Connersville (IN) Fire Department

“Magnetic hoses are simpler and more reliable. No air supply is needed to make them work, so there is nothing to break down. We had high expectations from MagneGrip and we were not disappointed.”

Tim Albertson, Chief, Huntington (IN) Fire Department

“With AirHAWK 3000 XL systems now installed in two of our fire stations, we like the cleanliness and tidiness of the bays. We also like the passive system of exhaust removal where no firefighter intervention is needed. It’s totally automatic. The air purification system is started by photo-eye sensors and no matter where engines are parked -- in any station or bay, the system works automatically. The system is reliable providing clean air constantly. We also appreciate the easy maintenance.”

Bill Priese, Assistant Chief, Meridian Charter Township (MI) Fire Department

“A big benefit of the MagneGrip System is the ease of use. The hose snaps on to the patented MagneGrip tailpipe adaptor with magnets; then auto sensors turn the blowers on when the apparatus is started to begin exhaust removal. It’s so quick and easy to use, our firefighters attach the nozzle, jump on the truck and we're on our way. As firefighters, we have a 40% greater chance than the general public of getting cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. It’s reassuring to know that with our exhaust removal system, we are reducing that risk and worry.”

Ronald DuBose, Captain, Mount Pleasant (SC) Fire Department

“Our first responders work to keep the St. John’s community safe. Exhaust removal is key for their health and safety. We implemented the exhaust removal system to protect our personnel and to be more prepared to respond to our community when they need help.”

Jeremy Robshaw, Captain, St. John’s County (FL) Fire Rescue

"I like the safety of the MagneGrip system. The lightweight, magnetic nozzle has a smooth release and it doesn't swing back forcefully like other systems."

Dales Duermit, Chief, Sharonville (OH) Fire Department

"We looked at the different systems, and MagneGrip's operation is extremely easy. Unlike other systems, the MagneGrip system has very little maintenance."

Randy Rigsby, Chief, Berea (KY) Fire Department

"We had the AirHAWK 3000 XL system installed in the apparatus areas of our department. The apparatus areas are noticeably cleaner, fume and dust free."

Tom Barstow, Chief, North Myrtle Beach (SC) Fire Department

By MagneGrip, Aug 15 2019 11:00AM

MagneGrip distributor, Murphy Specialty Inc. installed an exhaust removal system in an architecture design award winning EMS station in Boston. The approximately 10,500-square-foot structure comprises 11 nondrive-through apparatus bays, each double deep to accommodate two ambulances and outfitted with vehicle exhaust systems.

To read the full article, click here: https://rebrand.ly/j3gk77

By MagneGrip, Jul 25 2019 12:11PM

MagneGrip Group is exhibiting at two conferences in August 2019: Fire-Rescue International (FRI) in Atlanta, GA August 9-11 and South Atlantic Fire Rescue Expo (SAFRE) in Raleigh, NC August 23-23. MagneGrip Exhaust Removal Systems and AirHAWK Air Purification Systems products will be on display in booth 1323 at FRI and in booth 421 at SAFRE. Sales Representatives will be available to answer questions and demonstrate product features during both conferences.

MagneGrip Group manufactures air-cleaning systems for every firehouse application to eliminate exhaust fumes and other airborne contaminants that pose critical health risks.

MagneGrip Exhaust Removal Systems and AirHAWK Air Purification Systems are suitable for every firehouse application; they can be used separately or combined, for the most effective protection possible.

For more information and a budgetary proposal call MagneGrip at 800-875-5440, email info@magnegrip.com or visit www.magnegrip.com.

By MagneGrip, Apr 8 2019 12:00PM

MagneGrip Group is exhibiting at FDIC International 2019 in Indianapolis, IN April 11-13. MagneGrip Exhaust Removal Systems and AirHAWK Air Purification Systems products will be on display in booth 2145. Representatives will be available to answer questions and demonstrate product features.

MagneGrip Group manufactures air-cleaning systems for every firehouse application to eliminate exhaust fumes and other airborne contaminants that pose critical health risks. MagneGrip Exhaust Removal Systems and AirHAWK Air Purification Systems are suitable for every firehouse application. They can be used separately or combined, for the most effective protection possible.

For more information and a budgetary proposal call MagneGrip at 800-875-5440, email info@magnegrip.com or visit www.magnegrip.com.

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